Welcome to Unit 3! Our journey through Modern World History continues with a look at how the Age of Enlightenment sparked ideas that would fan the flame of revolution against absolute rulers in Europe and beyond...

Semester 2 Class 2 A: 1/10; C&F 1/11


The Haitian Revolution
Just as the French Revolution was inspired by the American Revolution, so to was the Haitian Revolution inspired by the French Revolution. To find out how, read the three essays on this website and complete the C-C-C for the Latin American section of your poster
Haitian Revolution
OR
you can watch these two videos, which together, take about 45 minutes.









SEMESTER ONE HISTORY EXAM:

Your exam will consist of 5 sections:

Section 1- 25 Multiple Choice Questions

Section 2- Matching exercise (timeline and key people)

Section 3- Short answer section

Section 4- APPARTS on Primary Source

Section 5- Thesis statement and supporting arguments (T3EL)



Class 45 D: 12/8, F&A: 12/9

The Congress of Vienna

After exiling Napoleon, European leaders at the Congress of Vienna tried to restore order and reestablish peace.
Read 'The Congress of Vienna' (Section 5 of the handout you got last class) and answer questions 4 and 5 on your gallery page.

A really very good student summary of the Congress of Vienna:


Complete worksheet p. 66 "Comparing Revolutions in America and France", paying particular attention to the stages all revolutions seem to go through according to Carl Gustavson.
  • Complete French Revolution C-C-C and 1/2 of images for border before the exam prep class.

Class 44 D&F: 12/7, A: 12/8

  • Opportunity to re-write ONE of your World Geography quizzes. You are not REQUIRED to do this -- it's optional. Whatever you grade you earn (higher or LOWER!) will replace your previous grade.

Consequences of the French Revolution
So what about Napoleon? Read Chapters in Brief handout section 3: "Napoleon Forges an Empire" and Section 4: "Napoleon'sEmpire Collapses" and complete pp 50, 51 and 53 of the Guided Reading packet you were given last class.

And now for a little more musical history:




There is a BBC program in their Heroes and Villains series on Napoleon which you CAN watch on YouTube but be warned, it's quite graphic and horrific in parts, and deals with Napoleon's major military victory. YOU DO NOT HAVE TO WATCH THIS, but if you're interested, it's kind of cool.

Here are the second and third parts of the video summary of the French Revolution we started last class:




Class 43 D&F: 12/5, A: 12/6


Causes of the French Revolution
We have already looked at how inequality in the estates, the spread of enlightened ideas, economic problems and weak leadership contributed to the revolutionary mood in France. In conjunction with this, there were a number of specific events which led to the French Revolution.Looking back at our notes, can you say did each of the following events led to the French Revolution? Can you think of others that belong in your "Causes" section for your poster?

  • Famine and inflation?
  • Louis XVI's calling of the Estates-General?
  • The swearing of the Tennis Court Oath?
  • The creation of the General Assembly?
  • The storming of the Bastille?

A short, funny, good summary of what you've learned so far about the French Revolution. Yeah, I wish I was this great a teacher!



Read Chapters in Brief: "The French Revolution and Napoleon, 1789-1815", section 1 (The French Revolution Begins) and section 2 (Revolution Brings Reform and Terror). In Chapter 7 packet, complete Guided Reading "The French Revolution Begins" (p 48) and Guided Reading "Revolution Brings Reform and Terror" (p 49). Also complete BOTH SIDES of single handout Reteaching Activity, pp 68 and 69 .

Revolution brings reform and terror



After the storming of Bastille and the house arrest of King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, the new revolutionary government of France made may reforms but also used terror and violence to retain power.


French_Revolution_Guillotine.gif
French_Revolution_Guillotine.gif





Read chapters 7-10 of Robespierre and the French Revolution or watch sections 7-9 of the History Channel documentary on the French Revolution. Your notes will be the raw material from which you complete your "course" and "consequences" poster sections.

After watching these three videos, doing your final reading/viewing assignment and checking out this list ofexternal image zip.pngFrench Rev Terms .pages , you should be ready to complete the "Course" section of your poster. When do you think the Revolution began? When did it end?

Class 42 D: 12/1, F&A: 12/2


  • Lady Gaga's French Revolution
  • You are now ready to live the French Revolution! Once you have your character assignment, you will cut and past your Character Profile on a page in the Student Gallery/French Revolution Diaries. While this is an opportunity for you to be creative, and to use your imagination, please remember that this is World History, and your character must be "plausible" i.e. you can't have your character act, think or write in a way they wouldn't (or couldn't) actually have acted, thought or written at the time.
  • Task: Using your background knowledge from all of your readings/viewing to create your character.
  • Process: Copy the prompts below. Paste them to your own diary page (links will be below) Then, use the prompts to help yourself imagine and create a character that is a) historically accurate, and b) interesting to you and us.


    Name:
    Age:
    Gender:
    Occupation:
    Social Class:
    Financial situation:
    Appearance:
    Location of home and/or business: Must be in the Paris region, but doesn't have to be IN Paris: (Use these maps to find your neighborhood: Map of France, Map of Paris )
    Habitual locations:
    Daily routine:
    Personality/Quirks/Unique Personality Traits:
    Past / Family History:
    Family:
    Social relations with your own and other classes (people you deal with or know about in other classes, AND your opinions and feelings about them):
    Religion:
    Education:
    Style of speaking (i.e. formal, "down-to-earth", crude):
    Main privileges and/or conflicts:
    Portrait (avoid anachronisms -- clothing or objects in your portrait that are from the wrong time period):


    Example of character sheet: Artist Example 2008-9

    Character Assignments
D Block
Character Assignment
Andres
Fishmonger
Kevin
Peasant 1
Jason
Baker
Lizzie
Tailor
Jane
Blacksmith
Daphne
Peasant 2
Nayeon
Tavern Keeper
Carol
Peasant 3
Kathryn
Mother of 6
Raina
Milkmaid
Jessica
Cobbler
Kate
Market stall owner
Jasmine
Monseigneur
Jee
Midwife
Lisa
Marquis
Vicky
Radical journalist
Ethan
Philosophe
Justin
House Servant
Jin
American Diplomat
Chris
Peasant 4
Annie
Undertaker
F Block

Diana
Tanner
Linda
Butcher
Suji
Carter
Gloria
Dressmaker
Hye Rim
Wig Maker
Erin
Pig Farmer
Amy
Miller
Jessica
Wine Merchant
Peter
Peasant 5
Phillip A.
Haberdasher
Patricia
Peasant 6
Ryan
Wheelwright
Michael
Peasant 7
Sam
Paris Alderman
Patrick
Nun
Philip B.
Wet Nurse
Soo Jin
Groom
Mina
Royal Guard
Julie
Peasant 8
Cindy
Abbot
Vivian
Beggar
A Block

Ghada
Night Soil Collector
Catherine
Almshouse Widow
Jae Hyun P.
Debtor in Prison
Joonyon
Coachman
Wonjune
Peasant 9
Sundos
Comte (Count)
Eric
Butcher
Hannah
Peasant 10
Jae Hyun A.
Cook
Joseph
Daughter of Louis XVI
Jennifer
Knife Sharpener
Min
Courtier
Amy
Versailles gardener
Cindy
Newspaper editor
Danette
Thief
Alissa
Importer
Sarah
Estate Manager
Kaitlyn
Countess
Jack
Cheese maker
Stella
Day laborer
Sunpyo
Louis XVI

When you are finished, please read chapters 4-6 of Robespierre and the French Revolution or watch sections 4-6 of the History Channel documentary on the French Revolution. Don't forget to take thorough notes. You will need these to complete the "Course" section of your poster.

Class 41 D: 11/29, F&A: 11/30

  • World Geography Quiz #5


    Next class, YOU will be transported back to France and incarnated as a citizen who will have to live with this revolution. Will you support it? Be opposed? Join the fighting or stay quiet? Be a leader? How will these events affect your livelihood? If the revolution is successful will your life be any better than it is right now?


    French Revolution Wikipedia Article


    Before you can take on the role of French person during the Revolution you need to have a good understanding of what life was like in France during the 1700's. The other 9th grade classes (including Ms Dorsett's and Mr. Brayko's classes) will be creating a Wikipedia for the French Revolution. But what makes this wiki unique is that it will be 100% student-created and maintained. This will be used throughout the project for research purposes. Each class will choose a factor of analysis to focus their research. A factor of analysis is a "lens" through which we can look at history and to focus on certain things, while other things kind of "fade into the background" for the moment.

    Once the decision has been made, as a class, we will develop a definition of our factor of analysis, choose article topics, and post them to our wiki pages.

    Format:
    • Each article should have a min. of 300 to 500 words.
    • Your article should answer a question. The question should included at the top of your wiki article, but it is not part of it.
    • All writing should be in your own words. If quotes are used, they should not be any longer than 2 sentences long. No more than two quotes should be used in any one article.
    • You should consult at least 3 websites and/or print resources to ensure you have a good "complete" picture of your topic. Check out the websites below for reliable information on the French Revolution.
    • Paragraph form. No bullet points.
    • PROOFREAD. This is being published, and you want your best work out there!
    • You must include at least one illustration, map or chart, which is informative, not just decorative. It must have a title and/or explanation. An explanation is not a description of the format (eg. You would not write "This is a picture of French peasant"; you WOULD write "French peasant". You would not write "Map of France"; you WOULD write "France".)
    • Cosmetically well-arranged, and should easy to navigate if there is more than one page.
    • You may create hypertext links to OTHER articles in the Revolutions Wikipedia. Here are the links for Ms Dorsett's class Ms Dorsett's French Revolution Wikipedia
    • Works cited at the bottom of the page. You are welcome to use easybib.com. JUST PUTTING THE URL IS NOT ACCEPTABLE! Remember, you must consult at least 3 websites and/or print resources.
    • Your wiki article will be due next class and must be posted HERE on the pages I will create for you. Do NOT post on your gallery page.

    First we need to define our factor of analysis:
Block
Factor of Analysis
Definition of Factor of
Wiki Link
A
Social Hierarchy

Ghada - The Three Estates
Jae Hyun A. - The Goals of the Revolution
Jennifer - World View of the French Revolution
Sarah - Fashion in Different Social Classes
Danette - Paris Life
Sundos - The Revolutionary Class
Kaitlyn - The French Aristocracy
Sunpyo - The //Sans Culotte//
Jack - The Execution of French Aristocrats
Amy - The Second Estate
Alissa - The First Estate
Wonjune - Distribution of Wealth
Catherine - Class Conflict
Hannah - The French Monarchy
Joseph - The 3rd Estate
Min - Changes that Resulted from the French Revolution
Stella - Employment and Unemployment
Eric - French //Emigres//
Cindy L. - The Catholic Church
Jae Hyun P. - Taxes
Joonyon - Education
D
Economics
The trade of goods and
services and the use and
distribution of money to purchase
them.
Jason - The Value of French Currency
Kate - Inflation in France
Kevin - Poverty and the Revolution
Lizzie - France's Trading Partners
Jane - French Money in the 18th Century
Carol - The Causes of Inflation
Jin - The Wealth of the Church
Vicky - Inflation Before / After the Revolution
Chris - Money ant the Ordinary Parisian
Justin - The Problems of the French Peasants
Daphne - Debt
Andres - Trade Commodities
Nayeon - French Currency Value
Jee - Food Sales
Lisa - Distribution of Wealth
Annie - Land Ownership
Jasmine - The Poor
Jessica - Marie Antionette's Wealth
Kathryn - The Cost of Bread
Ethan - France's Allies
Raina - The Wealth of King Louis XVI
F
Ideology
The beliefs and values of people
which contributed to the French
Revolution and explains their
actions.
Suji - Changes in Peasant Thinking
Philip A. - Peasant Views of Louis XVI
Philip B. - Bourgeois Beliefs
Jessica - Peasant Women
Vivian - Louis XVI's Execution
Peter - The People's View of Louis XVI
Amy - Marie Antionette
Michael - The Jacobins
Erin - Democracy
Patricia - French Women and the Enlightenment
Julie - Philosophe's Views of Louis XVI
Patrick - Robespierre
Gloria - The Peasant Class
Hye Rim - What Peasants Valued
Ryan - Louis XVI's Attitudes
Cindy - French Newspapers
Sam - Criticisms of the Monarchy
Soo Jin - Revolutionary Beliefs
Diana - Women and the Revolution
Linda - Famous French Women
Mina - The Third Estate

Class 40 D&F: 11/28, A: 11/29


  • Continue working on poster.


French_Rev
French_Rev


The French Revolution
In 1789, a French observer commented upon the success of the American Revolution, saying, "This vast continent which the seas surround will soon change Europe and the universe." France had both financed America's war of independence and sent many French volunteers, like the Marquis de Lafayette, to assist them to drive out the British. They were eager to get revenge on the British, to whom they had lost all their territories in the Caribbean and North America (except the tiny islands of St. Pierre and Miquelon, which gave them fishing rights to the rich cod resources of the Grand Banks) after their defeat in the French and Indian Wars of 1754-1763 (also called the "Seven Years War", or to the French, "La Guerre de la Conquet" -- The War of Conquest). So they were overjoyed when the United States of America sent the British loyalists fleeing to Upper Canada (now Ontario) after the success of the Revolutionary War (1775-1783).

The American Declaration of Independence was widely circulated and admired in France. One Frenchman remarked, "We talked of nothing but America." Soon the French, inspired by the success of the American Revolution, were to launch their own.

Therefore our first task is to get some uniform background information. Recognizing that people learn in different ways, you may either read from a book Robespierre and the French Revolution or watch a History Channel documentary on the French Revolution. In either case, you will have the rest of the class to begin this, being sure to take notes on what you read/see.

Read:
1. Click on the KIS Server
2. Click on HS
3. Click on HS_Student_Share
4. Click on World History 9th Grade
5. Download Robespierre French Revolution PDF file onto your computer. If you simply open the file at school, you will not be able to open file at home. This task must be accomplished here at school. Your task is to read and take notes on chapters 1-3.

OR

Watch History Channel "The French Revolution" chapters 1-3.

Over the next few days, you will be reading the whole book and/or watching the whole video, so you can get a head start on this if you have time. Of course you can read the book and watch the video if you want to be very solid in your understanding of the French Revolution.

Class 39 D&F: 11/22; A: 11/29


  • Use colored tapes provided to neatly lay out your poster with 4 quadrants and a border.
  • Glue central panel (with revolution quote and image).
  • Create a title "Revolution" which should be glued in center of the top border of our poster
  • Create neat titles for quadrant 1, The American Revolution, and quadrant 2, The French Revolution and glue these on.
  • Type up sections for Causes, Course and Consequences of the American Revolution using notes you completed for homework. Use proper MLA format citations for ALL information which is not common knowledge.
  • Search for suitable images for the border (remember to number the images and cite your source, in MLA format, on a Works Cited page which you will glue to the back of the poster). You may also make your own illustrations. Glue them on neatly.
  • If you finish all of this, you can begin your homework, which is to read and take Cornell notes on Chapter 7 "The French Revolution and Napoleon", MWH pp 214-221 (online or new hard copy) or pp 190-196 (old hard copy).

Class 38 D: 11/18, F&A: 11/21 (I will be at THIMUN-Singapore for D block, so you will have a substitute teacher)


Revolution and the Birth of Modern Democracy


What happens when Enlightened ideas come face to face with Absolutism?
As you can imagine most people were not all that thrilled living under these ABSOLUTE KINGS and QUEENS...SO what are their options?


enlightenment.jpg
enlightenment.jpg

Enlightenment Ideas

+

louis-xiv-of-france.jpg
louis-xiv-of-france.jpg

Absolute Rulers

=

explosion.jpg
explosion.jpg

Revolution!
Certainly they could live with it and certainly many did. However, there were those who took many of the Enlightenment ideals and decided that enough was enough! 'Nothing will ever change if we don't make the change!' was their cry.

In order to organize what we have learned and will learn about revolutions over the rest of the semester, you will be creating a large poster using this template: external image zip.png Revolutionary poster.pages

Your poster should be on brightly colored foam posterboard. Around the edges, create a 5 cm wide border, like a picture frame. This border should be filled with appropriate images (hand drawn, cut from magazines, or printed from the internet).

In the center section, you will print, by hand or from the computer, in appropriately large font size, your favorite quote on revolution. Here is a selection to choose from: external image zip.png Revolution Quotes.pages

You must illustrate your quotation with an appropriate symbol or picture, and it must include color.

You will notice that each quarter of the poster focuses on a different revolution, but each is organized using C-C-C (Causes, Course, Consequences). The first revolution is one that you ought all to be familiar with, the American Revolution.

Read and take notes on textbook pp 206-211 (online or new hard copy) or pp 183-187 + Visual Summary on p 188 (old hard copy).




The Declaration of Independence is a document that truly reflects Enlightenment ideas. For the first time in history, these ideas, born in France and spread throughout the world by conversations, printed pamphlets and books, become a concrete social experiment. A seed from the Old World takes root in the New, and grows into a strong and beautiful tree: Modern Democracy.

declaration_of_independence_stone_630.jpg
declaration_of_independence_stone_630.jpg


The men who signed their names at the bottom of this document were risking everything -- their lives, homes and property -- to overthrow a monarch they felt had betrayed the "contract" between a ruler and his people.


But getting rid of a bad government is only the first step. What to replace it WITH? Americans saw this as a golden opportunity to put into practice the ideals they had been talking about for so long -- Enlightenment ideals.

On this website you can read the Declaration of Independence and the other "Charters of Freedom" on which the United States is founded: The Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

Class 37 D: 11/16; F&A: 11/17 (I will be at THIMUN-Singapore so you will have a substitute teacher)

  • Regional Geography Quiz #4

CASE STUDY: King Louis XIV of France

||

"I am the state" King Louis XIV
"I am the state" King Louis XIV
"I am the state" King Louis XIV
"I am the state" King Louis XIV




Read "A Day in the Life of Louis XIV", then spend some time "wandering around Versailles" using this website
I particularly urge you to look at the palace and gardens ("Explore the Estates"), and then to wander through "Significant Dates", "Court People" and "Versailles Through History".


HOMEWORK TASK: KEY SKILL - Creating a time line.


List the major events of Louis XIV’s reign using a timeline (example below). Use your textbook pp 138-143 (old hard copy) or pp 162-168 (online or new hard copy) to help you. Identify which events on your timeline strengthened the French Monarchy and which events weakened it by write strengthening events in blue, weakening events in red, and neutral events in green. Make sure you explain why it strengthened or weakened the French Monarchy. Include an appropriate SYMBOL or ICON for each event. This may be drawn, or taken from the internet (cited of course) but it should NOT be a picture of the event itself, but a symbol that represents the event.

Timeline of Louis XIV's reign
<--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------->
1643 - 1715


Class 36 D&F: 11/15; A: 11/16 (I will be at THIMUN-Singapore for A block, so you will have a substitute teacher)


“Power tends to corrupt; absolute power corrupts absolutely.Great men are almost always bad men.”
-John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton, 1st Baron Acton

Prior to the Enlightenment, monarchs were believed to rule by "divine right" -- God made them kings, and made other people peasants, and no matter where you were in the social hierarchy (ladder), that was where you were SUPPOSED to be -- no one even considered trying to change it, because that would be going against providence (God's will), and no good could come of THAT!

As new ideas about the nature of man, society and government began to spread throughout France and the rest of Europe through thesalons, the Encyclopedie and the writings of the philosophes, monarchs reacted in much the same way as the Church had reacted to the new ideas of the Reformation and the Scientific Revolution: by tightening their grip on power or by trying to "go with the flow". Some seized on Hobbes' idea that the only way to have peace and order was to have Absolute Monarchs, wielding absolute power -- people should be happy to give up some of their personal freedoms if the result was good, right?

Other monarchs rejected this heavy-handed approach, wanting to be seen as "enlightened rulers" -- they might have been born to royalty but still wanted to be seen as civilized, reasonable men and women who were justified in wielding power because they were, well, modern. (Of course being enlightened didn't mean they were ready to give up their power!) They at least paid lip service to the Enlightenment ideals of liberty, the natural rights of man, free speech and so on -- but only to a point!

So who was the "Most Absolute of the Absolute Monarchs"? Who was the "Most Enlightened Despot" ("Despot" is another word for "tyrant", so consider what this common oxymoron implies) . Were they, as Baron Acton suggested, "absolutely corrupt"?

Your task: Imagine that you are a public relations consultant for either Frederick the Great, Catherine the Great or Joseph II. The monarch that you represent wants to be named "Most Enlightened Despot of the 1700's". You've all seen election campaign posters, so make one for your "client". Do this online, using Glogster (click on the green "EDU" circle on the bottom right of the page, then scroll down a little to "create your own glog" as a student -- the code you need is 5AFB7G) and post to your Gallery page by the beginning of next class. Make sure there are some good solid facts included -- remember, "the people" (you and your classmates) are going to being using their REASON to make their choices.

Read ONE of the following articles from ABC-CLIO and take notes (any format) for discussion next class on the power each monarch had, and the use they made of it. Were they loved, or hated, by their people? Why?

Go to KIS Secondary Library
Log-in to ABC-CLIO World History: The Modern Era
Username: kis
Password: welcome
Then click on the link below each picture and it will take you to the correct page in the ABC-CLIO database.






1. Catherine the Great
1. Catherine the Great

1. Catherine the Great
D Block
F Block
A Block
Catherine the Great
Jason
Kate
Kevin
Lizzie
Jane
Carol
Jin
Suji
Phillip A.
Philip B.
Jessica
Kevin
Vivian
Peter
Amy
Ghada
Jae Hyun A.
Jennifer
Sarah
Danette
Sundos
Kaitlin
Catherine II The Great ABC-CLIO Article





2. Fredrick the Great
2. Fredrick the Great

2. Fredrick the Great
D Block
F Block
A Block
Fredrick the Great
Vicky
Chris
Justin
Daphne
Andres
Nayeon
Lisa
Michael
Erin
Patricia
Julie
Patrick
Gloria
Hye Rim
Sunpyo
Jack
Amy
Alissa
Wonjune
Catherine
Hannah
Frederick II The Great ABC-CLIO Article





4. Peter I the Great
4. Peter I the Great

4. Peter I the Great
D Block
F Block
A Block
Peter I the Great
Jee
Annie
Jasmine
Jessica
Kathryn
Ethan
Raina
Ryan
Cindy
Sam
Soo Jin
Diana
Linda
Mina
Joseph
Min
Stella
Eric
Cindy
Jae Hyun
Joonyon

Peter I The Great ABC-CLIO Article

Class 35 D&F: 11/11; A: 11/14 (I will be absent for Speech & Debate for F block, so you will have a substitute teacher)


  • A block will be Speed-Dating with the Philosophes
  • Power and Authority (Absolutism in Europe)


    The Enlightenment was a time when new ideas were put into practice, particularly in the area of government. Prior to the Enlightenment, most monarchs ruled with an iron fist. It was believed that the state and its citizens existed to serve the monarch. However, during the Enlightenment a new idea began to take root. This idea was that the monarch existed to serve the state and support the citizens. This was a huge shift in thinking which formed the basis of the democratic governments we have today.

  • Read the article on Absolutism below and answer the questions on your gallery page.
    Go to KIS Secondary Library
    Log-in to ABC-CLIO World History: The Modern Era
    Username: kis
    Password: welcome
  • "Absolutism."

  • (This is the SECOND article you need to read)

  • Questions: (Decide whether each should be answered as a sentence or as a paragraph)
  • 1) What is absolutism?
    2) Explain the justification for absolutism referred to as the 'divine right of kings'.
    3) List the causes of the rise of Absolutism in Europe.
    4) Explain briefly how absolutism developed in
    • Spain
    • France
    • England
    • Russia




Currently, 44 sovereign nations in the world have monarchs acting as heads of state, 16 of which are Commonwealth realms that recognize Queen Elizabeth II as their head of state. The historical form of absolute monarchy is retained only in Brunei, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Swaziland, Vatican City and Bhutan. (from Wikipedia)

800px-World_Monarchies.svg.png


Class 34 D: 11/9, F & A: 11/10

  • Speed-Dating with the Philosophes -- to whose mind/ideas are you most attracted? Why? You will visit at least 10 iMovie "Dates" and write a 1-2 sentence response. (A block will be doing this in class 35)







Class 33 D: 11/7; F&A: 11/8


What do these two paintings tell you about the way children were viewed in Europe prior to and after the Enlightenment?

PortraitOfTwins.jpg
PortraitOfTwins.jpg



Joshua_Reynolds.jpg
Joshua_Reynolds.jpg

Painted by Joshua Reynolds, 18th century British artist

Many philosophes, including Jean-Jacques Rousseau and the Earl of Shaftsbury reacted against Hobbes' view of the life of man in a state of nature as "nasty, brutish and short" with the contrary image of the "noble savage". Rousseau argued that in a state of nature, men are essentially animals, and that only by acting together in civil society and binding themselves to its laws do they become men. For Rousseau only a properly constituted society and reformed system of education could make men good. His fellow philosophe, Voltaire, who did not believe in equality, accused Rousseau of wanting to make people go back and walk on all fours. (Wikipedia)

Carib_Painting_2.jpg
Carib_Painting_2.jpg

Agostino Brunias, 18th century Italian painter

Join the **Fishbowl on the Enlightenment (D)**

or Enlightened Fishbowl (F)



Class 32 D&F: 11/4; A: 11/7 (I will be attending SEOMUN on Friday, so D and F blocks will have a substitute teacher)


Read about the European Enlightenment in MWH pp 171-177 (old hard copy) or pp 195-201 (online or new hard copy) and take Cornell notes.


Class 31 D&F: 11/2; A: 11/3 (I will be attending SEOMUN on Thursday, so A block will have a substitute teacher and will do the class work for class 32 first -- we'll do Class 31 when I return)


Unit Objectives:


  • Explain how the ideals of the Enlightenment led people to question Absolutism and, in some cases, to consider revolution.
  • Analyze the rule of Louis XIV in France as a case study in Absolutism
  • Examine the causes, course and consequences of the American, French, and Haitian Revolutions.
  • Explain how the French Revolution developed from constitutional monarchy to democratic despotism to the Napoleonic empire.
  • Analyze leading ideas of the revolution concerning social equality, democracy, human rights, constitutionalism, and nationalism and assess the importance of these ideas for democratic thought and institutions in the 20th century.
  • Explain how the revolution affected French society, including religious institutions, social relations, education, marriage, family life, and the legal and political position of women.
  • Describe how the wars of the revolutionary and Napoleonic period changed Europe and assess Napoleon’s effects on the aims and outcomes of the revolution.

Enduring Understandings: (Students will understand that...)

  • *Revolution occurs when tyranny meets individualism and self-determination.
  • *Social class often determines perspective and social class is not static.
  • *Revolution can take different forms.
  • *Revolutions often spark other revolutions
  • *Absolutism as a means of governing is inherently prone to abuse of power.
  • *The ideals of the Enlightenment laid the foundation for modern thinking.
  • *Political thought can be classified into 3 broad categories: conservative, moderate, and liberal.

Essential Questions:

  1. What are the common causes, characteristics and consequences of revolutions?
  2. What is the difference between conservative, moderate and liberal political thought?
  3. How does one’s social class impact their perspective on change?
  4. Why is Absolutism as a form of governing problematic and how can it lead to revolution?
  5. How do revolutions often lead to other revolutions?
  6. How are political, social and economic revolutions similar and different?
  7. What are the ideals and sources of the Enlightenment and how do they impact our modern world?

The Enlightenment

In the last unit you learned how Europeans began to open their minds to new ways of thinking about the world around them, about the role of the Church, about their role in the universe. They had struck out across the oceans, discovering new lands, and claiming vast territories. For the first time, the whole world was known and mapped, and the networks of trade, colonialism and conflict drew the peoples of the world together in an ever more complex web of interactions and connections. For the first time in human history we could meaningfully talk about "humanity" and "the world", and no longer be just talking about PART of humanity and PART of the world.

By the mid-18th century, new ideas about human society and government were sweeping across Europe. This intellectual movement, known as the Enlightenment, started in France, and gave birth to revolutionary ideas like democracy and individual rights. Let's take a look at some of these key ideas.**

Let's begin by considering what "Enlightenment" might look like: The Parable of the Blind Men and the Elephant
The Philosophes
The Philosophes


The Philosphes' Key Ideas:

1. Reason
2. Nature and Deism
3. Happiness
4. Progress
5. Liberty & Tolerance


Watch this short video produced by another history teacher in the United States to help her students understand what some of these people thought:



You will be looking at this article by Richard Hooker about some key Enlightenment Thinkers, The Philosophes

Everyone will read the sections "Seventeenth Century Enlightenment Thought", "The Eighteenth Century" and "The Philosphes", then choose ONE philosophe (or "pre-philosphe") to introduce. You will be taking on the role of one of the philosophes in a round of Speed Dating next class.


Individual Project: Speed-Dating for the Open-Minded
speeddate.jpg
speeddate.jpg



Clearly, it's better to be open-minded than closed-minded right? People will, well, LIKE you more if you're open-minded. And of course there's always the chance that being open-minded could lead you to making a discovery, or coming up with an invention or new idea that no one else has though of yet. And that would make you REALLY cool!

We going to ask you to "become" one of these open-minded people who made contributions to Europe, and the world, at a time when lots of people were, well, not so open-minded. Your task will be to create a 2 minute dating video for "yourself" using iMovie (click on "Get to Know iMovie for a video tutorial if you've never used it before). What can you tell prospective partners about yourself -- what you've done or discovered, where you've been or what you've invented -- that will make them think YOU ROCK! Costumes are optional, but will of course boost your grade! So will speaking in appropriate accents, using appropriate props, adding cool background music....

Post your iMovie project on your gallery page by the beginning of class 34 (D: 11/9, F&A: 11/10)

Choose your philosophe (or pre-philosophe) here

Does the Enlightenment End?