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This wiki is for Ms Boyle's World History 9 wiki for blocks A, D and F



world_in_black_and_white_hands
world_in_black_and_white_hands

Please carefully read the World History 9 Syllabus 2011-2012

What to Do When You're Absent from Class
First, if you are sick, I want you to stay home and rest until you are completely recovered; you are NOT expected to do school work while you are ill! On the morning of the day you return to school, or as soon as possible, come to see me to arrange a reasonable deadline for any work you may have missed while you were away. Do not wait until your regularly scheduled class to ask for an extension, or any missed assignments may be considered late. In accordance with school policy, you may only submit missed work for credit if your absence was "excused". I cannot accept work missed during an "unexcused" absence. Doctor's notes should be turned in to the high school secretary in Mr. Christenbury's office.



SEMESTER TWO HISTORY EXAM:

  • D Block: Thurs. May 31 8:00-9:35
  • F Block: Fri. June 1 8:00-9:35
  • A Block: Mon. June 4 8:00-9:35



Your exam will consist of 5 sections:

  • Multiple Choice Questions 40 pts

  • Matching (events, people) 10 pts

  • Completing 3 Charts 30 pts

  • Primary Source 10 pts

  • Short answer 10 pts


Here's the list of WW II events you had to order in class -- sorry, this isn't the answer key, just the events.





Use this as a memory-jogger. Also useful is to go through the wiki unit pages to refresh you memory about what we studied.


Late pass (1 per semester -- may not be carried over) entitles you to turn in work up to 24 hours late without penalty.

A Block
Student
Semester 1
Semester 2
Ghada


Jae
12/14
2/14
Jennifer

5/1
Sarah


Danette
12/8
2/14
Sundos


Kaitlin

2/1
Sunpyo
12/2
2/16
Jack
11/10

Amy


Alissa


Wonjune


Catherine
12/2
2/14
Hannah
12/14

Joseph

2/16
Min
11/10

Stella
12/8

Eric
12/2
2/10
Cindy
11/10
5/10
Jae Hyun


Joonyon

1/18


D Block
Student
Semester 1
Semester 2
Jason

2/13
Kate

5/18
Kevin
12/1

Lizzie
11/7

Jane
12/1

Carol
12/1
1/18
Jin

2/15
Vicky
11/7

Chris


Justin

2/15
Daphne


Andres


Nayeon
11/7

Lisa
11/7

Jee


Annie
11/7

Jasmine


Jessica
12/1
2/9
Kathryn

2/8
Ethan
12/1

Raina



F Block

Student
Semester 1
Semester 2
Suji
12/2
2/14
Phllip A
12/13

Philip B
12/9

Jessica


Kevin


Vivian

5/15
Peter
12/2
3/8
Amy
12/9

Michael

2/15
Erin
12/13
2/15
Patricia


Julie


Patrick


Gloria
12/13

Hye Rim


Ryan
12/13

Cindy


Sam
12/7
2/14
Soo Jin


Diana
12/13

Linda


Mina




If you've never worked with wikispaces before, here's some useful information to help you get started:

On the left you will find links to the unit we are studying, gallery pages where you will be posting all digital assignments, and a homework page to let you know what is due each class.

HOW TO DRIVE A WIKI:


RULES OF WIKI USE
  • All work should be posted directly on your personal gallery page, unless instructed otherwise. Go to your block's Student Gallery, click on your name, and post all new assignments ABOVE previous assignments. Each assignment should be dated and should have a title that clearly identifies what it is (eg. 18th Sept. 2011 Notes for Textbook Reading Assignment pp. 52-54). Use the "Insert Horizontal Line" button above to draw a line between assignments.
  • If you are uploading an image, audio or video file, you MUST give it a unique name or you may over-write someone else's file. Name you files using your own name + a meaningful title (eg. John W's Imperialism Podcast).
  • Technical difficulties with the wiki are not an excuse for turning in late work. Work which is not posted before the start of class on the day it is due will be marked late, and the appropriate penalties will be applied.
  • You are publishing this work to the world therefore remember to keep it academically appropriate. Do not share any personal information on the wiki, and use only your first name (that you use in class) and the first letter of your surname.

Here is a link to PowerSchool, but do NOT check grades during class time!

external image pdf.png Using the school printers.pdf


Historical Thinking Skills

1. Crafting Historical Arguments from Historical Evidence
  • Historical Argumentation
Historical thinking involves the ability to define and frame a question about the past and to address that question through the construction of an argument. A plausible and persuasive argument requires a clear, comprehensive and analytical thesis, supported by relevant historical evidence — not simply evidence that supports a preferred or preconceived position. Additionally, argumentation involves the capacity to describe, analyze, and evaluate the arguments of others in light of available evidence.
  • Appropriate Use of Relevant Historical Evidence
Historical thinking involves the ability to identify, describe, and evaluate evidence about the past from diverse sources (including written documents, works of art, archaeological artifacts, oral traditions, and other primary sources), with respect to content, authorship, purpose,
format, and audience. It involves the capacity to extract useful information, make supportable inferences and draw appropriate conclusions from historical evidence while also understanding such evidence in its context, recognizing its limitations and assessing the points of view that it reflects.


2. Chronological Reasoning
  • Historical Causation
Historical thinking involves the ability to identify, analyze, and evaluate the relationships between multiple historical causes and effects, distinguishing between those that are long-term and proximate, and among coincidence, causation, and correlation.
  • Patterns of Continuity and Change Over Time
Historical thinking involves the ability to recognize, analyze, and evaluate the dynamics of historical continuity and change over periods of time
of varying length, as well as relating these patterns to larger historical processes or themes.
  • Periodization
Historical thinking involves the ability to describe, analyze, evaluate, and construct models of historical periodization that historians use to
categorize events into discrete blocks and to identify turning points, recognizing that the choice of specific dates privileges one narrative, region or group over another narrative, region or group; therefore, changing the periodization can change a historical narrative. Moreover, the particular circumstances and contexts in which individual historians work and write shape their interpretation and modeling of past events.


3. Comparison and Contextualization
  • Comparison (similarities and differences)
Historical thinking involves the ability to describe, compare, and evaluate multiple historical developments within one society, one or more developments across or between different societies, and in various chronological and geographical contexts. It also involves the ability to
identify, compare, and evaluate multiple perspectives on a given historical experience.
  • Contextualization
Historical thinking involves the ability to connect historical developments to specific circumstances of time and place, and to broader regional,
national, or global processes.


4. Historical Interpretation and Synthesis
  • Interpretation
Historical thinking involves the ability to describe, analyze, evaluate, and create diverse interpretations of the past — as revealed through
primary and secondary historical sources — through analysis of evidence, reasoning, contexts, points of view, and frames of reference.
  • Synthesis
Historical thinking involves the ability to arrive at meaningful and persuasive understandings of the past by applying all of the other historical
thinking skills, by drawing appropriately on ideas from different fields of inquiry or disciplines and by creatively fusing disparate, relevant (and
perhaps contradictory) evidence from primary sources and secondary works. Additionally, synthesis may involve applying insights about the past to other historical contexts or circumstances, including the present.




Work Turned in Hard Copy

All printed assignments must include your FULL name on the front page, with an assignment title and date submitted. If there are multiple pages, they must be stapled together. Submitting work on recycled paper is encouraged. You will not be given class time to print assignments -- do this at home or before class. Assignments may be handwritten, but sloppy work will not be accepted.


A very cool World Clock, that shows you, in real time, the number of people being born, dying, getting malaria, etc. World Clock

Regional Geography Quiz Dates:

Quiz #1 Class 18 F&A: Thursday, Sept. 29; D: Friday, Sept. 30
Quiz #2 Class 23 F: Wednesday, Oct. 12; A: Thursday, Oct. 13; D: Friday, Oct. 14
Quiz #3 Class 29 D: Thursday, Oct. 27 (Note this is a change) F&A: Friday, Oct. 28
Quiz #4 Class 37 D: Wednesday Nov. 16 (Note this is a change); F&A: Thursday, Nov. 17
Quiz #5 Class 41 D: Tuesday Nov. 29 (Note this is a change); F&A: Wednesday, Nov. 30, D: Thursday Dec. 1

Re-take Class 45 D: Thursday Dec. 8; F&A: Friday, Dec. 9


Each test day you will have the option of taking one regional test until you have taken all five. You must locate and label countries correctly, so yes, you need to know how to spell them! For each region, you must be able to label the following numbers of countries:

Asia and Oceania /22
The Americas /27
Europe /40
The Middle East /23
Africa /45 ** Sudan has now been divided into TWO countries: Sudan in the north, and South Sudan in the south.

A useful interactive (and fun) website to help you learn the location of these countries is lizardpoint.com